Bivolt socket 127V and 220V, how to connect?

 

Have you ever thought about having an outlet with two different voltage levels ? With the Bivolt socket, it is possible to have a socket point with different voltage levels at the same point. But is it within the norm? In this article, Mundo da Elétrica shows the technical details of the socket and explains how to install the Bivolt socket.

Features of Bivolt Socket
The Bivolt socket in relation to the common sockets is a little different! The first difference is that below the socket there is a voltage selector switch, similar to those used in computer sources. It is this selector switch that is responsible for changing the voltage between 110V and 220V. When performing the voltage change it is possible to notice that it is not very easy to access the key with your finger, which can be a positive point in terms of security.

When performing the voltage change it is possible to notice that it is not very easy to access the key with your finger.
Bivolt socket has a voltage selector switch.

The second different point is at the back of the socket, see that it has 4 terminals for connecting the Bivolt socket has two terminals for the phase cables L1 and L2, the N for the neutral cable, in addition to the terminal for the protection cable that has a grounding symbol. The identification of the terminals is not very difficult, and the packaging shows how to make the connection.

The Bivolt socket has two terminals L1 and L2 for the phase cables.
The Bivolt socket has 4 terminals for connecting the cables.

Installing the Bivolt Outlet
The installation of the Bivolt socket is not a seven-headed bug! The point where the outlet will be installed must have two phase wires, one neutral and one earth. This means that for the installation of this Bivolt socket, the power supply in your home must be at least biphasic. With the wires properly separated, just connect the wires to the socket according to the indication of the socket terminals.

The point where the socket will be installed must have two-phase wires.
Connect the cables to the terminals of the Bivolt socket.

Multimeter Test
After completing the installation, perform a test with a multimeter to verify that the Bivolt socket is working correctly. The first test is with the switch in the 110V position, internally the socket selects phase and neutral. With the multimeter’s probes in the socket, the measurement is around 127V, so that part is ok. In the second test changing the switch to the 220V position, the socket internally changes to phase and phase, and the multimeter measures the voltage close to 220V, so we can conclude that the voltage selection device works correctly.

We can conclude that the voltage selection device works correctly.
Test with a multimeter to verify that the Bivolt outlet is working.

Bivolt Outlet Meets Standards?
There are two standards that should be consulted to analyze whether the Bivolt socket can be used in electrical installations. The first standard to be consulted is NBR 14136 that deals with sockets, it has no restrictions on the use of a Bivolt socket, because of NBR 14136 only deals with the constructive part of the socket, that is, the shape of the plug that the socket accepts, the presence of the safety recess, the presence of the third grounding pin and others.

NBR 14136 only deals with the constructive part of the socket.
The NBR 14136 standard that deals with sockets.

The second standard to be analyzed is the NBR 5410 standard, which deals with low voltage electrical installations. In NBR 5410 there is an item 6.5.3.2 that talks about the identification of different voltage sockets. In item 6.5.3.2 it says that: “Care must be taken to prevent improper connections between plugs and outlets that are not compatible. In particular, when there are outlet circuits with different voltages, the fixed outlets of the higher voltage circuits, at least, must be clearly marked with the voltage supplied to them. This marking can be done by a plate or adhesive, fixed on the socket mirror. It should not be possible to easily remove that mark. In the case of SELV systems, the requirements of 5.1.2.5.4.4 ”must be met.

In item 3.4.6 of the NBR 5410 standard, it says that: “an outlet point may contain one or more current outlets.” So, consulting the standards it is possible to state that the Bivolt socket can be used in the electrical installation. In the image below we can see that the selector of the Bivolt socket has the voltage marking, which serves as identification. As the standard does not specify what would be “clearly marked”, it is possible to interpret that this mark is already adequate.

It is possible to state that the Bivolt socket can be used in the electrical installation.
The selector of the Bivolt socket has the voltage marking.