Understand what step tension is in practice!

The initial tests are with dry land! The first test is with the tips of the multimeters further apart, in the second test we will bring the probes a little closer to see the difference, and finally, we will bring the probes even closer. Observe in the image below that when energizing the transformer, in the first test the multimeter measures approximately 33 V, in the second test the multimeter measures approximately 9 V, and in the last test the multimeter measures almost 4 V.

Initial tests are on dry land.
Levels of pitch stress with dry land.

We can conclude with the tests, that using a 2000 V transformer we can have a voltage of up to 30 V, even with a few centimeters of the distance between the wires and with the soil very dry. Now imagine a lightning strike that the voltage can reach millions of volts! In this case, the difference of a few centimeters from one step to the next can be fatal.

Remember that the rays are usually accompanied by rain, so let’s repeat the test with the soil very wet. The first test is with the tips of the multimeters closer together, in the second test we will move the probes a little apart to see the difference, and finally, we will move the probes further apart.

We put the tips of the multimeter very close together, when connecting the transformer the measurement made by the multimeter is just over 60 V, which is already enough to cause an electric shock. Then with the probes apart, the measurement is just over 200 V, then placing the probes well apart the multimeter measures more than 540 V.

Enough to cause an electric shock.
Levels of pitch stress with wet soil.